IKS Co-Sponsored Lecture: Aimee Lee, "The Social Ecological Relationships of Korean Papermaking in Ohio"

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Aimee Lee
November 17, 2022
4:10PM - 5:30PM
Location
Kottman Hall 103, Zoom

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2022-11-17 16:10:00 2022-11-17 17:30:00 IKS Co-Sponsored Lecture: Aimee Lee, "The Social Ecological Relationships of Korean Papermaking in Ohio" The College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and Institute for Korean Studies Present: "The Social Ecological Relationships of Korean Papermaking in Ohio" Aimee Lee Abstract: In 2010, Aimee Lee built the first Korean papermaking studio in North America at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio. This made full use of their kozo (Broussonetia papyrifera) garden and expanded it with dye plants and other plants necessary for traditional papermaking, usually done by farmers in cycle with the seasons in Korea. Since then, she has built and expanded more studios while traveling the world to share her extensive research on hanji (Korean paper) and how it connects to Korean history, culture, ecology. Her award-winning book, Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking (The Legacy Press) includes her ongoing vision of why hanji has a place in the immigrant-rich US. At her current private hanji studio in South Euclid, she continues to use native North American plants like milkweed to create hybrid hanji that reflects her own Korean American heritage. In this talk, she will share images, videos, hanji samples, and her stories of this practice that extends back nearly a thousand years—paper made by people from plants. In this seminar Aimee will share the social-ecological relationships embedded in her work, how she creates community-based partnerships to identify, cultivate, and harvest plants used in her work, and how art can be a vehicle for exploring natural resource issues more deeply. Download the PDF flyer here.  Kottman Hall 103, Zoom East Asian Studies Center easc@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description

The College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences and Institute for Korean Studies Present:

"The Social Ecological Relationships of Korean Papermaking in Ohio"

Aimee Lee

Aimee Lee

Abstract: In 2010, Aimee Lee built the first Korean papermaking studio in North America at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio. This made full use of their kozo (Broussonetia papyrifera) garden and expanded it with dye plants and other plants necessary for traditional papermaking, usually done by farmers in cycle with the seasons in Korea. Since then, she has built and expanded more studios while traveling the world to share her extensive research on hanji (Korean paper) and how it connects to Korean history, culture, ecology. Her award-winning book, Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking (The Legacy Press) includes her ongoing vision of why hanji has a place in the immigrant-rich US. At her current private hanji studio in South Euclid, she continues to use native North American plants like milkweed to create hybrid hanji that reflects her own Korean American heritage. In this talk, she will share images, videos, hanji samples, and her stories of this practice that extends back nearly a thousand years—paper made by people from plants. In this seminar Aimee will share the social-ecological relationships embedded in her work, how she creates community-based partnerships to identify, cultivate, and harvest plants used in her work, and how art can be a vehicle for exploring natural resource issues more deeply.

Download the PDF flyer here

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Meeting ID: 941 8782 8515

Password: 491711

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Free and Open to the Public 

If you require an accommodation, such as live captioning, to participate in this event, please contact EASC at easc@osu.edu. Requests made at least two weeks in advance of the event will generally allow us to provide seamless access, but the university will make every effort to meet requests made after this date. 

This event is supported by a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant to The Ohio State University East Asian Studies Center.