EASC Outreach: Ohio Sijo Student Competition 2021

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EASC logo
February 16 - May 1, 2021
12:00AM - 10:59PM
Location
Online (Submission required)

Date Range
Add to Calendar 2021-02-16 00:00:00 2021-05-01 22:59:00 EASC Outreach: Ohio Sijo Student Competition 2021 The East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University presents an Ohio Sijo Student Competition for K-12 students in Ohio to honor the traditional Korean form of poetry by introducing it to students. New to Sijo?  No problem, materials available to help students write Sijo poetry. Online Sijo Teacher workshop available (self-paced, asynchronous, online) for teachers. Deadline: May 1, 2021 RULES: Open to Ohio K-12 students. Students create original Sijo poem. Submit Sijo online by May 1, 2021. Winners notified in May 2021. DIVISIONS: High School (grades 9-12) Elementary/Middle School (grades K-8) PRIZES: First Place: $250 Second Place: $150 Teachers of place winners will receive $100 of Korea-related materials. Online submission link Learn more about Sijo: Sijo Introduction (link to google slides) Flyer: Sijo Student Competition Flyer Notes about Sijo: Sijo (pronounced SHEE-JO) is a form of Korean poetry that was sung in three lines.  The first line introduces the theme or question, the second line answers the theme or question and the last line has a twist for the end. There are a total of 44-46 syllables total, with 14-16 per line broken up in sections.  Each line has a pause in the middle with smaller pauses between the other sections.  Lines 1 and 2 have similar syllable count (3-4-3-4 syllables per section) and content, Line 3 has a different syllable count (3-5-4-3 per section) and content (twist).  There is some variation in syllable count per line.  As each line can be long, they are sometimes broken up into two.  More details at Sijo Introduction. EXAMPLE: “Love,” It is a lying word. That you love me, another lie. “The loved one is seen in dreams.” That is still a greater lie.  How can I, who can never sleep, hope to see you in my dreams? -Kim Sangyong (1561-1637)   Coordinated by the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University (OSU). Sponsors: Korea Foundation and a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant to the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University. Online (Submission required) East Asian Studies Center easc@osu.edu America/New_York public
Description
Korea Foundation logo

The East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University presents an Ohio Sijo Student Competition for K-12 students in Ohio to honor the traditional Korean form of poetry by introducing it to students. New to Sijo?  No problem, materials available to help students write Sijo poetry. Online Sijo Teacher workshop available (self-paced, asynchronous, online) for teachers.

Deadline: May 1, 2021

RULES:

  • Open to Ohio K-12 students.
  • Students create original Sijo poem.
  • Submit Sijo online by May 1, 2021.
  • Winners notified in May 2021.


DIVISIONS:

  • High School (grades 9-12)
  • Elementary/Middle School (grades K-8)


PRIZES:

  • First Place: $250
  • Second Place: $150
  • Teachers of place winners will receive $100 of Korea-related materials.

Online submission link

Learn more about Sijo: Sijo Introduction (link to google slides)

Flyer: Sijo Student Competition Flyer

Notes about Sijo:
Sijo (pronounced SHEE-JO) is a form of Korean poetry that was sung in three lines.  The first line introduces the theme or question, the second line answers the theme or question and the last line has a twist for the end. There are a total of 44-46 syllables total, with 14-16 per line broken up in sections.  Each line has a pause in the middle with smaller pauses between the other sections.  Lines 1 and 2 have similar syllable count (3-4-3-4 syllables per section) and content, Line 3 has a different syllable count (3-5-4-3 per section) and content (twist).  There is some variation in syllable count per line.  As each line can be long, they are sometimes broken up into two.  More details at Sijo Introduction.

EXAMPLE:

“Love,” It is a lying word.
That you love me, another lie.

“The loved one is seen in dreams.”
That is still a greater lie. 

How can I, who can never sleep,
hope to see you in my dreams?

-Kim Sangyong (1561-1637)

 

Coordinated by the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University (OSU). Sponsors: Korea Foundation and a U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant to the East Asian Studies Center at The Ohio State University.